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Decorating Options.

There are many available processes to get your logo on T-Shirts, pens, or any other promotional products. Here is a list, along with brief explanations of each.




Casting
Chenille
Cloisonné
Debossing
Decal Transfer
Die Struck
Dye Sublimation
Embroidery
Embossing
Engraving
Epoxy coating
  Etching
Glass Etching
Hot Stamping
Laser Engraving
Laser Print
Pad Printing
Pewter Medallions
Photo Etching
Screen Printed Vinyl Labels
Screen Printing
Tackle Twill

Casting

Method in which molten metal is forced into a mold, made either of rubber or plaster, and cooled in the desired shape. Because the process often uses precious metals for jewelry, business gifts, etc., and a master or model is required to make a mold, specific samples are rarely given.

Chenille

Hand tufting in multi-coloured wool or cotton yarn onto heavy fabric creates a luxurious pile design.ChenilleChenille This classic style offers a very high perceived value. Best suited for: melton wool, leather or polar fleece jackets. Not suitable for lightweight fabrics. (Pictured on right)

Cloisonné

Metal emblems are stamped from a die. A coloured paste made from ground glass is applied into the recessed areas of the emblem. The emblem is then fired at 1400º and polished by stone and pumice to achieve brilliant colour. Gullies and ridges separate each individual colour, so fine lines between colours are difficult to achieve. This is considered a very high-quality product, and is slightly more costly than other alternatives. Used in jewelry and pins. (Pictured below)

Cloisonne

Debossing

DebossStamping an image on a material, such as paper, leather or suede, so the image sits below the surface of the object. Ink may or may not accompany the stamp. (Pictured on right)

Decal Transfer

A water-soluble decal, printed on an offset or letterset press, is submerged in water and slid onto the product to be imprinted. The decal is rubbed with a cloth or squeegee to remove any excess water and air from between the product and the decal. The product is then kiln-fired. Once fired, the decal becomes fused with the glaze. Hairline registration and superior reproduction of detail make it an excellent choice. This imprint withstands washing very well. This method is labour intensive, since each decal must be aligned and applied by hand. Used in porcelain, ceramic, and glass products.

Die Struck

Molten metal is injected into the cavity of a carved die. In the case where a double-sided impression is necessary, two dies are placed together, carved sides facing the inside, and the molten metal is injected between them. Fine detail is available, and thinner lines available than with die-struck products. Used in metals such as jewelry, pins and belt buckles. (Pictured below)

Dye Sublimation

Using multi-colour heat transfers, we can reproduce up to four-colour process images on several of our products. Your acceptable artwork is scanned and applied to a transfer paper which is then applied to your product utilizing heat and pressure.
(Pictured on right)

Embroidery

A design stitched onto a material through the use of high speed, computer controlled sewing machines. The design is reproduced with tightly-stitched thread. Embroidery is most commonly done directly on wearables and on logo patches. Fine detail is difficult but not impossible to achieve.


Embossing

Stamping an image on a material, such as paper, leather or suede, so the image rises above the surface of the object. As in debossing, ink may or may not accompany the stamp. When a design which is stamped without metallic leaf or ink (giving a bas-relief effect), it is referred to as "blind embossing". (Pictured on right)

Engraving

The cutting or etching of designs or letters on metal, wood, glass or other materials. There are three engraving techniques, hand-engraving, hand-tracing and computerized (laser) engraving. Engraving is performed with a diamond point or rotary blade that cuts into the surface of the product. Engraving offers a permanent imprint that will not wear off because it is cut into the metal base. Used in metals such as trophies, pens and nameplates. (Pictured on left)

Epoxy coating

This process involves the application of a protective clear epoxy coating over an imprint. By applying this dome, the imprinted product has a three dimensional appearance and adds further protection against wear and tear.

Etching

The product to be imaged is coated with a resist (a protective coating that resists the acid). An image is exposed on the resist, usually photographically, leaving bare metal and protected metal. The acid attacks the exposed metal thus leaving the image etched into the surface of the metal. Very fine lines can be reproduced by this process and the only tooling is a piece of film, so specific samples are easily-made.

Glass Etching

A process in which a piece of glass is covered with a template that has a design cut out of it. The glass is then sandblasted while the portion of the item not covered by the template is protected. The template image is thus etched into the glass. (Pictured on right)

Hot Stamping

Method in which type or designs in the form of a relief die are impressed with heat and pressure through metallic or pigmented foil onto the printed surface. It is used to decorate fabric, leather, paper, wood, hard rubber, coated metal and all types of plastic. Hot stamping is a "dry" imprinting process meaning the object can be handled immediately after the stamping without fear of smearing the imprint.

Laser Engraving

A process in which an optically-read or stenciled art or copy is engraved (burned) into a material by a laser beam. Wood is the most common lasered material, but acrylic, some plastics, marble, leather and paper are also used. Metal requires specialized lasers. In addition to the exceptional detail of your logo, laser engraving provides a "sense of luxury".

Laser Print

Heat Transfer Printing (Direct Transfer Process)

Image is screened onto a transfer substrate, which is then laid directly on the material to be imprinted. The image is then "transferred" from the substrate to the material through the use of heat and pressure.

Heat Transfer Printing (Sublimation)

A process in which a design is transferred to a synthetic fabric by heat and pressure. The heat causes the inks to turn into a gas so that they penetrate the fabric and combine with it to form a permanent imprint.

Pad Printing

Your corporate logo is acid etched into a specialized printing plate where ink is then applied. A soft silicone pad is pressed down onto that plate, then reapplies the image directly to the product. Pad printing advantages include improved image detail, improved color registration and the ability to print contoured surfaces. (Pictured on left)

Pewter Medallions

Custom drafted two-dimensional medallions are crafted and then glued to caps, jackets, mugs and other products. Copper plating and colour-filling are two variations. Although this process may be bulky for some items, it adds perceived value to some (i.e. beer steins). (Pictured on right)

Photo Etching (Metal)

Process in which an illustration and/or copy is imprinted into metal, usually aluminum, by acid and then sealed by an anodizing process. This is popular for awards and plaques. (Pictured below)

Screen Printed Vinyl Labels

This process is a method of silk screening your logo on the reverse side of a transparent vinyl panel. The result is a permanent imprint that is protected from the elements. A background colour is applied behind the imprint and the panel is affixed to the product. (Pictured below)

Screen Printing

A method in which an image is transferred to the surface to be printed by means of ink squeezed by a squeegee through a stenciled screen stretched over a frame. Screens are treated with a light-sensitive emulsion, and then the film positives are put in contact with the screens and exposed to a strong light. The light hardens the emulsion not covered by the film leaving a soft area on the screen for the squeegee to force ink through. Screen printing is capable of printing on irregular shaped objects. Glass, plastic, fabric and wood are popular materials on which to screen print. Also called "silk screening."

Tackle Twill

Appliquéd images often seen on varsity jackets. Unique, high perceived value. Best suited for: jackets, heavy fabrics. No set up. Many fabric and colour combinations. Not suitable for lightweight fabrics. (Pictured on right)

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